Heel – toe adjusting a badly fitting UPVC door.

Here is an old, badly fitting UPVC door.  It was sagging badly on its hinges, hitting the frame so it wouldn’t close. The hinges were non adjustable, so the the only option was to remove the glass and repack the door panels.  By packing the panels on the diagonal (heel – toeing) it shifts the door back into square with                                                                          the frame.

Eugh. A badly drilled door.

Badly drilled door
What a messs

I was asked to do a lock change on a commercial premises. It was obvious that a lock had been drilled at some point in the past. Underneath the escutcheon the door was a right mess.

There is sometimes a need to drill a lock if it is broken and there’s no other way to open it, but it shouldn’t look like this mess.

A drilled lock should be replaced with a new lock (otherwise the hole in the hardplate will be a weakness in security). The hole in the door should then be neatly filled and covered.  In a later post I’ll show you another lock that’s been drilled (not by me) and badly repaired.

Making a church key

 

Church rim lock
Boxed centre warded rimlock

This 19th century lock is off a Forest of Dean historic church.  It was made by John Moreton & Son, dating from the late 1800s. It had its only key stolen and a replacement was needed. A cast iron blank was initially shaped on a grinder. It was then hand filed to pass the centre warding.

Ross-Dean locksmith making a key

 

Double glazing repair
About to start filing key to fit warding. Normal chubb key shown below for scale.

 

Cutting a car key

Here is a clip of cutting a car key. This is a VW T5 Transporter key. If you’ve lost your key, there clearly isn’t a key to copy.  If you don’t have the keycard, we can use special tools to decode the lock. We then send these settings to a computerised CNC cutting machine to cut the key.

Cutting VW T5 key

August's draw giveaway is a 'surf key' (non transponder key to open/lock the doors) for your vehicle. Simply like, share or comment to be in with a change of winning. (If you win, I'll send the key to a work/friend/relative's address where the van IS NOT kept – for obvious reasons). Winner will need to send a good quality photograph of their key for decoding).

Posted by Ross-Dean Locksmiths on Sunday, 30 July 2017

Transponders

VW transponder
See that chip on the end of the key? That’s the transponder that the immobiliser needs to recognise before the car will start. If it isn’t the right chip already programmed into the car, then it won’t start. This particular chip is a VW ID48, sat on a HU66 key.
VW Transponder. ID48 T6
VW ID48 T6 transponder on end of HU66 key